若宮 直紀 教授Wakamiya, Naoki

Graduate School of Information Science and Technology
Bio-systems Analysis Lab

<!--:ja-->若宮 直紀 教授<!--:--><!--:en-->Wakamiya, Naoki<!--:-->

Professor Wakamiya has long engaged in research that applies the principles underpinning the expandability, adaptability, durability, and other superior qualities of organisms to information networks. He is working to design new systems that will help resolve “big data” problems.

A starting point for my research: The synchronous illumination of fireflies

I am developing solutions to a range of problems that information networks currently face, and will confront in the future, using mathematical models that reproduce the behavior of living things.

My initial focus was on fireflies. These creatures emit light as individual entities, but when they group together, they are able to synchronize their emissions very successfully, even though they are not being controlled collectively. I thought that by devising a mathematical model that explains this synchronization and operating it on an information network, we could achieve an autonomous, dispersed form of synchronization control. This was the start of my research on information networks inspired by biology.

Our current network is at a critical stage

Created half a century ago, the world’s first computer network consisted of just four computers. Today, however, if we include gaming consoles, there are several billion devices connected, both wired and wirelessly, to a single network. And when the TCP/IP protocol suite that we use to access the internet was first conceived some 30 years ago, there were only a few thousand computers in the whole world. The network itself has thus grown exponentially, beyond what anyone predicted, but it still relies on the same old systems, augmented by new systems added in a makeshift way. This network is habitually unstable. It is not designed to cope with sudden and dramatic growth in scale, diversity, or complexity.

photo_sample01wakamiya

Living creatures adapt to changes in their environment

Molecules, cells, tissue, organs, entities, groups, ecosystems: Life is composed of small structural components that become interconnected to form complex structures and organizations. Man-made systems are similarly made up of various different components, but they are designed to perform optimally in the conditions under which they are intended to operate. As we can see from the fact that there is life even in deserts and arctic zones, living creatures are highly adaptable to different environments. And despite the fact that each individual organism acts independently based on its own judgments, this independence does not undermine the cohesion of the group, society or system.

I believe that we can apply these kinds of bio-mechanisms to ensure that our massive, complex information networks continue to function into the future without breakdowns. I am convinced that our ability to build the next generation of information networks hinges on interdisciplinary research involving experts in biology and other fields.

Achieving synergies through interdisciplinary research

photo_wakamiya02My graduate school has been encouraging interdisciplinary research linking biology and information science for some time. We have also undertaken many joint research projects with the Center for Information and Neural Networks (CiNet) and other research organs. Information scientists learn from biologists and biologists learn from information scientists, creating synergies that yield advances in both disciplines and reveal possibilities for many practical engineering applications.

-->

インターネットは生物から何を学ぶか

情報ネットワーク研究は
もはや、融合研究なしでは行き詰まる。

若宮 直紀 教授Wakamiya, Naoki

Wakamiya, Naoki

情報科学研究科 バイオシステム解析学講座

<!--:ja-->若宮 直紀 教授<!--:--><!--:en-->Wakamiya, Naoki<!--:-->

拡張性、適応性、頑健性などの生物の優れた特性をもたらす原理を情報ネットワークの仕組みに応用する研究を続けてきた若宮教授。
ビッグデータ問題の解決にもつながる新たなシステムの構築に取り組んでいる。

始まりは蛍の発光同期

私は生物の挙動を再現する数理モデルを使って、現在の、また将来のネットワークが抱えるさまざまな問題の解決に取り組んでいます。
最初に注目したのは「蛍」。
蛍は個体としては独立して発光していますが、群れになると、決して集中制御されているわけではないのに、うまく同期して発光するようになることが知られています。
この蛍の発光同期を説明する数理モデルを情報ネットワーク上で動作させることにより、自律分散的な同期制御を実現しようというのが、生物に学ぶ情報ネットワークに関する私の最初の研究テーマでした。

 現行のネットワークは危機的状況

半世紀前に生まれた世界初のコンピュータネットワークは、4台のコンピュータで構成されていました。ところが今や、ゲーム機も含めると世界中で数十億台の機器が、有線や無線によって情報ネットワークにつながっています。
また、今もインターネットで使われているTCP/IPが約30年前に誕生した時には、世界には数千台のコンピュータしか存在しませんでした。
誰も想像できなかったほどの規模で、ネットワークの爆発的な増大が起きているにもかかわらず、昔ながらの仕組みが使われ続け、また、場当たり的にいろいろな仕組みが追加されているわけです。
ネットワークは常に不安定な状態です。急激な規模や多様性、複雑性の増大に対して、耐えられるようにはできていません。

photo_sample01wakamiya

 生物は環境変化に適応する

生物は、分子、細胞、組織、器官、個体、集団、生態系のように、小さな構成要素がつながり合って複雑な構造、組織を作り上げています。
工学的なシステムもさまざまな部品から構成されていますが、使われる環境を想定し、その環境において最もうまく、最適に動くように設計されています。
砂漠や極寒の地で活動する生命体がいることからも分かるように、生物は、さまざまな環境に合わせる高い適応力があります。また、個体・個人としては、それぞれが独立に判断して行動しているのに、社会や組織として破綻していません。
私は、このような生物の仕組みをネットワークに取り入れることによって、大規模で複雑な情報ネットワークがこの先も破綻なく動作し続けられるようになると考えています。新世代の情報ネットワークを構築するには、生物学など、ほかの分野との融合研究が不可欠だと思えるのです。

 融合研究で相乗効果を

photo_wakamiya02

私の所属する研究科では、以前から生物学と情報科学の融合を進めてきました。また、脳情報通信融合研究センター(CiNet)などほかの研究機関との共同研究も数多く実施しています。
情報科学者が生物科学者に学ぶと同時に、生物科学者が情報科学者に学ぶという相乗効果により、双方の研究分野が発展し、また、さまざまな工学的な応用の可能性が開けると思っています。

研究室のホームページはこちらから